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Solbari featured in The Times

Solbari featured in The Times

We are thrilled to see Solbari recommended by The Times as one of the best clothing brands with an adequate Ultraviolet Protection Factor.

Three ways to avoid sun damage

by Peta Bee,

1. Keep using sunscreen

Concerns were raised last week when researchers from the US Food and Drug Administration published findings in the medical journal JAMA that revealed that the chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the bloodstream. But, says Dr Andrew Birnie, a skin cancer surgeon and spokesman for the British Association of Dermatologists, it is still important to use it. “It’s worth noting that the amounts of sunscreen used in this study were significantly higher than the average person would use in normal circumstances,” he says. And it’s vital to apply it correctly. Research by the University of Liverpool has shown that on average people miss almost 10 per cent of their face when applying sunscreen, with the area around the eyes and nose the most neglected.

Choose a sun cream over an SPF moisturiser. The latest issue of the scientific journal Plos One found that those who use SPF moisturisers tend to miss more, especially the eyelids.

2. Eat a spoonful of tomato puree every day

Lycopene, a carotenoid that gives tomatoes their colour, has been shown to protect skin against UV light damage. Daily consumption of cooked or dried tomatoes, for optimal absorption, is the best way to boost lycopene intake.

A 2017 study by Ohio State University showed that mice fed a daily diet of tomato powder and exposed to ultraviolet light experienced a 50 per cent decrease in skin cancer tumours compared with mice that didn’t consume tomato. A spoonful of tomato puree reduces skin reddening after sun exposure, reported the British Journal of Dermatology.

3. Wear the right clothes

“The first line of defence against the sun should always be shade and clothing,” says Birnie. Black and dark blue tend to absorb more UV (meaning less reaches your skin) than lighter colours. If you wear colours, choose vivid ones — a red top absorbs substantially more UV rays than pale pink. Fabric with a tight weave, such as denim, allows less UV light through. And clothing with an embedded sun protection factor is a good idea. The British Association of Dermatologists  recommends clothing produced with Ultraviolet Protection Factor: try Solbari or Cotswold Outdoor.

Solbari Sun Protection offers an award-winning range of UPF 50+ sun protective clothing, broad brim sun hats, arm sleeves and umbrellas. Solbari is the leading Australian sun protecting clothing brand with customers in over 70 countries.

You can find out more about Solbari's certified UPF50+ sun protective range by clicking the blue links below
Women UPF50+ 
Men UPF50+ 
Sun hats UPF50+ 
Accessories UPF50+

The Solbari team 
This blog post is for information purpose only, always consult your medical professional.



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